Eratosphere Forums - Metrical Poetry, Free Verse, Fiction, Art, Critique, Discussions Able Muse - a review of poetry, prose and art

Forum Left Top

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-13-2012, 09:33 PM
Michael Juster Michael Juster is offline
Distinguished Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Belmont MA
Posts: 4,082
Default Divided common language question

Does "tool" have some sexual connotations in the UK?

No need to get too explicit...
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-13-2012, 09:42 PM
Patricia A. Marsh Patricia A. Marsh is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Ohio - USA
Posts: 683
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Yes. http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/index.htm
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-13-2012, 10:13 PM
Michael Cantor Michael Cantor is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Plum Island, MA , USA
Posts: 9,234
Default

Mike - it has exactly the same connotations in the US. You really have to get out more.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-13-2012, 10:25 PM
Jesse Anger Jesse Anger is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Posts: 1,063
Default

Its phallic connotations are secondary to its connotations of idiocy. I don't talk about my tool but I know a guy who is one. Then there's dick -- that guy's a dick, but that's more like calling him an asshole. Strange.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-13-2012, 11:47 PM
Skip Dewahl Skip Dewahl is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 664
Default

Heard (sic) this line in a British movie comedy, but still don't know what was supposed to be so funny about it: "Wait, wait, let me get the dictionary out of my fanny-pack to confirm or disprove some or all of that!"
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-14-2012, 12:15 AM
Michael Cantor Michael Cantor is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Plum Island, MA , USA
Posts: 9,234
Default

Indeed, "tool" has a rich history in the UK. Here are some examples from a wonderful little book called Some Limericks, by Norman Douglas, privately printed in 1928. I found it at the bottom of my father's shirt drawer when I was about eight years old, and for a great many years everything I knew about rhyme and meter - and sex, for that matter, and even geography (and probably a few things about the English upper classes) - came from that slim volume.

There was an old man of the Cape,
who buggared a Barbary ape.
The ape said: "You fool!
You've got a square tool;
You've buggared my arse out of shape."

There was an old man of Stamboul
With a varicose vein in his tool.
In attempting to come
Up a little boy's bum
It burst, and he did look a fool.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-14-2012, 04:59 AM
Jerome Betts Jerome Betts is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,138
Default

Skip. it eventually dawned that 'fanny-pack' must be the equivalet of 'bum-bag'. Out of context the line doesn't seem obviously funny. Perhaps there was supposed to be some amusement for UK audiences in hearing the unfamiuliar US 'fanny-pack'?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-14-2012, 05:17 AM
Jayne Osborn's Avatar
Jayne Osborn Jayne Osborn is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Middle England
Posts: 3,823
Default

Skip,
As Jerome says, we don't use the term 'fanny-pack' in the UK. (I'm not surprised you didn't find that line funny - it's a pretty dire attempt at comedy!)

Michael,
There's also the use of 'tool' to mean a gun, as in 'he was tooled up'. This has given rise, on numerous occasions, to ambiguities such as: "He's got a very big tool", "I told him to put his tool away" etc.

Jayne
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-14-2012, 05:49 AM
Michael Juster Michael Juster is offline
Distinguished Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Belmont MA
Posts: 4,082
Default

That's helpful. "Tool" it is.

Thank you all.

P.S. Michael, coming to Powow twice a year isn't enough getting out?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:13 AM
John Whitworth's Avatar
John Whitworth John Whitworth is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 8,771
Default

Norman Douglas can't spell. And in my opinion, on the evidence of these two limericks, Robert Conquest aka Jeff Chaucer is much better. Try him.

A person who is a tool is not the same as a person who is a prick, not the same at all. And I think if you call someone a penis, as people do in 'Four Weddings and a Funeral', is something else again.

Got it, old cock?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



Forum Right Top
Forum Left Bottom Forum Right Bottom
 
Right Left
Member Login
Forgot password?
Forum LeftForum Right


Forum Statistics:
Forum Members: 7,432
Total Threads: 15,740
Total Posts: 203,855
There are 123 users
currently browsing forums.
Forum LeftForum Right


Forum Sponsor:
Donate & Support Able Muse / Eratosphere
Forum LeftForum Right
Right Right
Right Bottom Left Right Bottom Right

Hosted by ApplauZ Online