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  #21  
Old 04-12-2017, 06:42 AM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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I've noticed that the majority of words people have chosen cannot be easily rhymed. And no one has gone with a one-syllable word. Make of that what you will.
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  #22  
Old 04-12-2017, 07:04 AM
Duncan Gillies MacLaurin's Avatar
Duncan Gillies MacLaurin Duncan Gillies MacLaurin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Slater View Post
And no one has gone with a one-syllable word.
I chose several.

Duncan
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  #23  
Old 04-12-2017, 07:09 AM
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Douglas G. Brown Douglas G. Brown is offline
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Uniformitarianism
Diatomaceous
Platypus
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  #24  
Old 04-12-2017, 07:24 AM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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Many of our lexical choices are indeed both erudite and recondite. I could expatiate further, as I am wont, but I digress. The nub - the crux - of my argument is an old one: brief words have weight.
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  #25  
Old 04-12-2017, 07:52 AM
E. Shaun Russell E. Shaun Russell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Isbell View Post
Many of our lexical choices are indeed both erudite and recondite. I could expatiate further, as I am wont, but I digress. The nub - the crux - of my argument is an old one: brief words have weight.
He's not a formalist, but Larry Levis' "Elegy With an Angel at its Gate" leans heavily on the importance of "its" -- in the title, to be sure, but also throughout. Such an insignificant word, yet so weighty in that long poem.

There are many other examples, of course, but that one springs to mind.
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  #26  
Old 04-12-2017, 11:40 AM
Jan D. Hodge Jan D. Hodge is offline
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Velleity

my favorite didactylic: minimifidian

my favorite diamphibrachic: uxoriophilic ["being in love with being in love with one's wife," a rather apt description of Petruchio?]
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  #27  
Old 04-12-2017, 05:45 PM
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Jayne Osborn Jayne Osborn is offline
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Skanky - it's not a pleasant way to describe someone or something, but I love it all the same, and use it a lot!

Magical

Dodecahedron

Jayne
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  #28  
Old 04-12-2017, 05:58 PM
Aaron Poochigian Aaron Poochigian is offline
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Skanky! That's great, Jayne. I also love the noun "skank": she's a skank!

Do you know "skink" as well? Here's a link to a skink: https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...Ls1oW4CA#spf=1

I could provide a link to a skank as well, if you wish.

A kink for skanks? No thanks!

Last edited by Aaron Poochigian; 04-12-2017 at 06:04 PM.
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  #29  
Old 04-12-2017, 06:26 PM
William Thompson William Thompson is offline
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chthonic
Theotokos
steatopygia
okra
siguiryas
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  #30  
Old 04-12-2017, 06:37 PM
E. Shaun Russell E. Shaun Russell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayne Osborn View Post
Skanky - it's not a pleasant way to describe someone or something, but I love it all the same, and use it a lot!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Poochigian View Post
Skanky! That's great, Jayne. I also love the noun "skank": she's a skank!
Ahh! Good one, Jayne...and it reminds me of it's "Sk" counterpart, "Sketchy," which I also love (and use far more often than I should).

And as per John's post, I was thinking of another short word that I adore -- "peep." It comes up in Shakespeare all the time, and I love it -- peeping out between Caesar's legs, for instance. It's so innocuous, and a strangely "cute" word, yet Shakespeare in particular often uses it in highly charged contexts.
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