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  #21  
Old 03-10-2018, 08:05 PM
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Catherine Chandler Catherine Chandler is offline
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In Canada, you might get away with it. In the US, no.
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  #22  
Old 03-10-2018, 08:34 PM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayne Osborn View Post

We pronounce ''faucet'' as force-it

Jayne
Where does the "r" sound come from?
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  #23  
Old 03-10-2018, 09:37 PM
Kevin Greene Kevin Greene is offline
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Roger, I don't know about Britain, but we see pronunciations like this in America. Well, at least we we used to. It's called the "intrusive 'r'" in cases like “It’s the lawr of the land.” (When I used to return to New York, I found myself slipping back to things like 'soder' for 'soda.') There is also something called the "linking 'r'" which is a little difficult to explain. This is where the same person might say, "You betta not," but who would also say "I can better aim."

As for 'faucet,' I don't know if linguists have a name for what happens that turns it into 'force-it.' My father, born in Brooklyn, used to say 'sore' for 'saw.'

My grandmother used to pronounce 'oil' as 'earl,' something that wasn't all that uncommon in the Easy when she was growing up.
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  #24  
Old 03-24-2018, 07:36 PM
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peter richards peter richards is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Slater View Post
Where does the "r" sound come from?
Force has no 'r' sound in received pronunciation.

The intrusive 'r' comes when two adjacent words respectively end and start with vowel sounds, hence: India (r) and Pakistan, but Pakistan and India.

There's a poem on the metric board with 'a bloody great shopping mall' in it, which should more properly be 'bloody great shopping centre'. You took our words and spat them back. :-)

If you want water, turn on the tap.
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  #25  
Old 04-01-2018, 11:02 AM
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Allen Tice Allen Tice is offline
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..............

Last edited by Allen Tice; 04-09-2018 at 12:24 PM.
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  #26  
Old 04-01-2018, 04:03 PM
James Brancheau James Brancheau is offline
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I think you're right, Aaron. It's a just a weird word. Maybe, maybe, hard to do whatever the angle/culture. Maybe just that word in the middle of the page. But it would have to be queueue.
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  #27  
Old 04-02-2018, 03:55 AM
Brian Allgar Brian Allgar is offline
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Bob, in England, there is no 'r' sound in 'force-it', which is pronounced 'faw-sit'.
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  #28  
Old 04-03-2018, 01:28 AM
Ken Brownlow Ken Brownlow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peter richards View Post
Force has no 'r' sound in received pronunciation.

The intrusive 'r' comes when two adjacent words respectively end and start with vowel sounds, hence: India (r) and Pakistan, but Pakistan and India.

There's a poem on the metric board with 'a bloody great shopping mall' in it, which should more properly be 'bloody great shopping centre'. You took our words and spat them back. :-)

If you want water, turn on the tap.

chequemate
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  #29  
Old 04-03-2018, 07:39 PM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Allgar View Post
Bob, in England, there is no 'r' sound in 'force-it', which is pronounced 'faw-sit'.
Same thing in the US, at least in my neck of the woods (NY area) and elsewhere that I've noticed.
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  #30  
Old 04-15-2018, 08:47 AM
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Nicholas Stone Nicholas Stone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayne Osborn View Post
We've adopted some of yours too: lots of people now say ''cookies'' instead of biscuits, for instance...
Biscuit=cooked twice
Cookie=cooked once

I believe that's the idea in British English anyway. The etymologies in Britain and US are different.

I'm told in America a "biscuit" means something else yet again. Americans should be careful of asking for "biscuits and gravy" when they're in Britain.

Last edited by Nicholas Stone; 04-15-2018 at 08:50 AM.
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