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  #11  
Old 07-23-2018, 07:07 PM
Martin Elster Martin Elster is offline
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Mary Oliver is well-known as a nature poet. I enjoy her work.

Also, there is a nice little book entitled Poems of Nature (edited by William Roetzheim, Level 4 Press, Inc.). I have a copy, which I purchased several years ago. The front cover blurb says: ďAn important collection of emerging and well-known poets.Ē óMiller Williams

This small anthology also contains a CD of various people reading the poems. I havenít heard it because, believe it or not, I donít have a CD player.

Mark Allinson, a former Spherian, has a poem in the book.

Last edited by Martin Elster; 07-23-2018 at 09:39 PM.
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  #12  
Old 07-23-2018, 07:42 PM
Roger Slater Roger Slater is offline
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Wendell Berry comes to mind. (And now see he's been mentioned).
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  #13  
Old 07-23-2018, 08:03 PM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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Yes, how did we miss Seamus Heaney? Or for that matter, Derek Walcott.

Cheers,
John
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  #14  
Old 07-23-2018, 08:33 PM
Mark Blaeuer Mark Blaeuer is offline
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Here are some nature-informed poets I like:

Harry Humes
William Pitt Root
Maggie Schwed
Keith Taylor
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  #15  
Old 07-23-2018, 08:41 PM
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Gail White Gail White is offline
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Going back in time a bit, there's the wonderful John Clare.
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  #16  
Old 07-24-2018, 12:51 AM
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Edward Zuk Edward Zuk is offline
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Wow. I came home from work and am delighted to see that the collected wisdom of the Sphere has come through.

Thanks to everyone who replied. I see that I will have to look more carefully at Mary Oliverís work, or at least her early work. The poem linked to by Michael is better than the others Iíve seen by her, but even there the clichťd ending about letting what you love go free is disappointing. Wendell Berry sounds very intriguing, and Iíll have to look up the half dozen poets whose names are new to me.

I know the work of Heaney and Walcott and think of their voices as having been formed much earlier, even though both wrote well until near the end of their lives. I see that Walcottís White Egrets is well thought of.

What Iím hoping is that someone will point me to newer emerging poets who are writing (or have the potential to write) the Tintern Abbey or Cooperís Hill of our age.

For context, I love the work of Amy Clampitt, and poems like The Cormorant in its Element and The Winter Bird are truly great. My favourite nature poem by hers is A Hermit Thrush, with its view of nature as constantly wounded and patching itself and making do. The nature poem with the greatest influence on me, though, is Corsons Inlet by A.R. Ammons, with its view of nature as ever-changing and defying categorization. Itís a view of nature as chaos theory and a poetics at the same time.

It bothered me that I couldnít name any poems from the last 20 years that have affected me in that way, and that I was ignorant of whatís happening now. So thank-you for your suggestions, and I hope that the recommendations will keep coming.
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  #17  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:13 AM
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Michael F Michael F is offline
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Edward, I've always read that poem as being about mortality and death, and the vital necessity of loving what must die. I don't think she's parroting the "if you love something, set it free..." saying. To me she's going rather deeper. Of course that may be my own peculiar reading.

Regardless, I also very much like this thread. Glad you started it.

M
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  #18  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:38 AM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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I also think the Oliver poem is about loving what must die; and I also found that ending rather predictable and underwhelming. Sorry. I seem to recall finding other poems of hers very fresh.

Cheers,
John
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  #19  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:55 AM
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Michael F Michael F is offline
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No need to apologize, John.

As they say on Wall Street, "That's what makes markets."
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  #20  
Old 07-24-2018, 08:46 AM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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:-)

Nice quote.

Cheers,
John
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