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  #11  
Old 01-09-2018, 07:24 PM
Aaron Poochigian Aaron Poochigian is offline
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Aaron N, you should just learn Latin and read the original. Itís worth it.

There had been some poems in Sapphic stanzas on the Met-Board, and a number of issues arose. Aaron, Horace does on occasion use a monosyllable as the last word in a line (as you do) but always for effect. Here the two terminal ďetĒs (andís) serve to convey the vastness of the trip:

Septimi, Gadis aditure mecum et
Cantabrum indoctum iuga ferre nostra et
barbaras Syrtes, ubi Maura semper
aestuat unda,

(Crib)
Septimius, you who are about to travel with me to Gades and
to the Cantabrian untutored as of yet in bearing our yoke and
to the wild Syrtes, where always the Moorish
surf is boiling,
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  #12  
Old 01-09-2018, 08:00 PM
Andrew Szilvasy Andrew Szilvasy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Poochigian View Post
Aaron N, you should just learn Latin and read the original. Itís worth it.
Yup.

Though Pooch's Latin facility far exceeds my own, I can muddle my way through Horace (a stab at 1.38 of mine is I still think on the board).

Given your deep love of the Aeneid, it would certainly be worth your time.
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  #13  
Old 01-09-2018, 08:15 PM
Aaron Novick's Avatar
Aaron Novick Aaron Novick is offline
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It's a life goal. It's not currently feasible, given my time constraints. So Horace in English it is.
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  #14  
Old 01-09-2018, 08:33 PM
Andrew Szilvasy Andrew Szilvasy is offline
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Originally Posted by Aaron Novick View Post
It's a life goal. It's not currently feasible, given my time constraints. So Horace in English it is.
Yeah. Understandable. Time is always the problem when it comes to everything. How I wish I could just earn an income in writing and audit classes in languages.
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  #15  
Old 01-10-2018, 01:12 AM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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The nice thing about the McClatchy Odes is that the Latin is on the facing page. Ars longa, vita brevis.

Cheers,
John
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2018, 09:10 AM
Aaron Poochigian Aaron Poochigian is offline
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John, I enjoyed the McClatchy edition primarily as a survey of contemporary poetry (in its time). For those who don't know the book, McClatchy had a variety of contemporary poets translate one ode each.
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2018, 06:53 PM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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Yes, I was using the English as a pleasant crib for the Latin (a thing I need these days), but I don't remember any of the versions being terrible. :-)

Cheers,
John

Last edited by John Isbell; 01-10-2018 at 11:11 PM.
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  #18  
Old 02-09-2018, 08:18 PM
Andrew Szilvasy Andrew Szilvasy is offline
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I'm refreshing my Latin in anticipation of taking the MTEL in Latin, and re-reading translations of Ovid, Horace, Catullus, and Vergil in English (and working through some in Latin in anticipation).

Forget "of all time," are we sure Ovid isn't the best Latin lyric poet?

Also, I have not loved the Ferry Horace.
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  #19  
Old 02-09-2018, 08:42 PM
Aaron Poochigian Aaron Poochigian is offline
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Nah, compression, range, versatility, subtlety--Horace wins. Anyway, Ovid is an epic and elegaic poet. Don't be a flibbertigibbet.
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  #20  
Old 02-09-2018, 10:14 PM
John Isbell John Isbell is offline
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At the risk of seeming a curmudgeon and perhaps a dilettante, Horace's music is also repeatedly quite lovely:

nec iam sustineant onus silvae laborantes, geluque flumina constiterint acuto.

Cheers,
John
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