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  #11  
Old 10-14-2018, 05:40 PM
Mark McDonnell Mark McDonnell is offline
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Ok, now they work
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  #12  
Old 10-14-2018, 05:48 PM
Andrew Szilvasy Andrew Szilvasy is offline
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The trials and tribulations of loving Blake sometimes: I've read all the arcane and difficult symbolic poems (Milton, The Four Zoas, Jerusalem, etc.) but somehow not "Ah, Sunflower!" Thanks for that, Mark. What a lovely list.

From reading your poems, I'm not surprised we share a love for Blake, Keats, and Bishop. I wish I had your self-control and could narrow the poems down.
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  #13  
Old 10-14-2018, 07:26 PM
Cally Conan-Davies Cally Conan-Davies is offline
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Ha! I can't believe you wrote Mushrooms, Sharkey! I've been playing this for the last day -- the album just came out last week.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHoN...&frags=pl%2Cwn

Ha!

C

Actually, I should say, find the whole play list. He does 'And Death Shall Have No Dominion', and Whitman 'With Animals', and Hopkins 'God's Grandeur' and Larkin 'The Trees'!!!!!

Last edited by Cally Conan-Davies; 10-14-2018 at 07:34 PM.
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  #14  
Old 10-15-2018, 06:51 AM
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Michael F Michael F is offline
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Itís interesting to see what people like, and to find the gems that I still need to get to (hello again, Li Po!). I canít put down a list of poems; I donít think I can even chose a favorite Dickinson poem. I can put down a list of poets, those I keep nearest my desk. They have changed and will change, as I change. Sorry, Aaron, for not following the rules.

As of today, and in no particular order:

Whitman
Auden
Szymborska
Rumi
Blake
Kabir
Hafiz
Keats
Wordsworth
Dickinson
Tagore
Frost
Shakespeare
Blake
Yeats
Mirabai
Bach (mystic poet of sound)
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  #15  
Old 10-15-2018, 12:23 PM
Mark McDonnell Mark McDonnell is offline
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I am pleased with my little list, Andrew, it felt like making a mix-tape, which I used to waste many a happy hour doing. Thanks for your primer on Stevens, who I always feel I should have read more of.

Cally! Wow. I listened to the whole album. What a pleasure!

I like this thread Aaron, thanks for starting it.

Last edited by Mark McDonnell; 10-15-2018 at 02:21 PM.
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  #16  
Old 10-15-2018, 12:40 PM
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Mary Meriam Mary Meriam is offline
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Quote:
Bach (mystic poet of sound)
Oh yes, Michael. Some of the poems/books that have especially moved me over the years:

Sappho, Love and the Trick-Stitching Child, read by Cally-Dinkum

Charlotte Mew, the first four poems on this page

Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market

Emily Dickinson, I cannot live with You

Emily BrontŽ, Stanzas

Edward Thomas, The Owl

Auden, September 1, 1939

Rose Kelleher, Enlightenment

June Jordan, Song of the Law Abiding Citizen

Tennyson, Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal

Geoffrey Hill, Requiem for the Plantagenet Kings
(along with all the other sonnets in Irresistible Sonnets)

Blake, London

HD, Helen in Egypt
Milton, Paradise Lost
Homer, The Odyssey (tr Emily Wilson)
Spencer, The Faery Queene
Shakespeare, Hamlet, especially this part:

Now I am alone.
O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!
Is it not monstrous that this player here,
But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,
Could force his soul so to his own conceit
That from her working all his visage wann'd,
Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect,
A broken voice, and his whole function suiting
With forms to his conceit? and all for nothing!
For Hecuba!
What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba,
That he should weep for her? What would he do,
Had he the motive and the cue for passion
That I have? He would drown the stage with tears
And cleave the general ear with horrid speech,
Make mad the guilty and appal the free,
Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed
The very faculties of eyes and ears. Yet I,
A dull and muddy-mettled rascal, peak,
Like John-a-dreams, unpregnant of my cause,
And can say nothing; no, not for a king,
Upon whose property and most dear life
A damn'd defeat was made. Am I a coward?
Who calls me villain? breaks my pate across?
Plucks off my beard, and blows it in my face?
Tweaks me by the nose? gives me the lie i' the throat,
As deep as to the lungs? who does me this?
Ha!
'Swounds, I should take it: for it cannot be
But I am pigeon-liver'd and lack gall
To make oppression bitter, or ere this
I should have fatted all the region kites
With this slave's offal: bloody, bawdy villain!
Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindless villain!
O, vengeance!
Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave,
That I, the son of a dear father murder'd,
Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell,
Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words,
And fall a-cursing, like a very drab,
A scullion!

Last edited by Mary Meriam; 10-15-2018 at 02:48 PM. Reason: had to add another one
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  #17  
Old 10-15-2018, 01:44 PM
Susan McLean Susan McLean is offline
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I find that individual poems have had less influence on me than the poets. Those that have become a part of me have done so based on a lot of poems, not just one or two. So here is a list of the ones with the biggest influence. I have many others that I enjoy reading, but that have not become part of my own psyche to the same extent.

Homer
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Euripides
Catullus
Martial
Ovid
Beowulf poet
Chaucer
Medieval ballad writers
Sidney
Shakespeare
Spenser
John Webster
Donne
Milton
Marvell
Pope
Blake
Byron
Wordsworth
Keats
Shelley
Tennyson
Browning (both)
Poe
Dickinson
Hardy
Baudelaire
Yeats
Parker
Eliot
Millay
Frost
Nash
Plath
Sexton
Bishop
Olds
Stallings
Pastan
Espaillat
Cope

Last edited by Susan McLean; 10-15-2018 at 01:52 PM.
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  #18  
Old 10-15-2018, 02:30 PM
Andrew Szilvasy Andrew Szilvasy is offline
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Nice list Mary and Susan.

A few people mentioned Hardy, and he totally slipped my mind; his brutal realism and unflinching irony are both powerful influences on me. I love a lot of his poems. Some are obvious (I lovelovelove "The Darkling Thrush") some are perhaps less so: "She, to Him (II)"
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  #19  
Old 10-15-2018, 03:24 PM
Mark McDonnell Mark McDonnell is offline
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Mary, thank you for that extraordinary video of June Jordan. I'd never heard of her and now I can't stop reading her (a dozen poems on Poetry Foundation).

See, that's why I love this thread.

Last edited by Mark McDonnell; 10-15-2018 at 03:38 PM.
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  #20  
Old 10-15-2018, 06:19 PM
Cally Conan-Davies Cally Conan-Davies is offline
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Hi Aaron, and other Thread-treaders,

A good time, for me, to think about this consciously again. My list is made of poems that have had such a powerful impact and influence, that are so twisted into my soul, that I doubt I can really think without them.

D.H. Lawrence. The Ship of Death

William Blake. Auguries of Innocence

T.S. Eliot. The Four Quartets

Syliva Plath. The Moon and the Yew Tree

W.H. Auden. The Fall of Rome

Cavafy. Ithaka

Robin Robertson. At Roane Head

Philip Larkin. Here

ee cummings. i carry your heart

Keats. Lamia and Lamia Part 2

Donne. Song

Wordsworth. Intimations Ode

George Mackay Brown. Hamnavoe

Yeats. The Circus Animals' Desertion

Tennyson. The Lady of Shallot

Christina Rosetti. Goblin Market

Thomas Hardy. The Self Un-seeing

Coleridge. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Andrew Marvell. Thoughts in a Garden

Dylan Thomas. Under Milk Wood

Banjo Paterson. Clancy of the Overflow

Walter de la Mare. The Listeners

Shakespeare. Macbeth, opening scene:

ACT I SCENE I A desert place.
[Thunder and lightning. Enter three Witches]

First Witch When shall we three meet again
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
Second Witch When the hurlyburly's done,
When the battle's lost and won.
Third Witch That will be ere the set of sun. 5
First Witch Where the place?
Second Witch Upon the heath.
Third Witch There to meet with Macbeth.
First Witch I come, graymalkin!
Second Witch Paddock calls. 10
Third Witch Anon!
ALL Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
Hover through the fog and filthy air.
[Exeunt]

Last edited by Cally Conan-Davies; 10-16-2018 at 04:11 AM.
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