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  #11  
Old 08-25-2018, 06:58 PM
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Allen Tice Allen Tice is offline
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Jim, I want to thank you for that comment. New new title. I've given Epicurus the medicine that would have healed the later Plotinus.

Last edited by Allen Tice; 08-26-2018 at 02:35 PM.
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  #12  
Old 08-26-2018, 03:23 PM
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New title, new verb.
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  #13  
Old 08-27-2018, 01:07 PM
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I bedefinitely* apologize for dwelling on this niche bit of academic trivia, but something tells me that it's important. This might be the last change, though I still like the rhythmic thump of "dispraising". A "swervish" effect comes from restoring the other metric wobble of an "__rly" word in line L4. The sonics there are close to the original, but "early" replaces "curly", which fits much better historically. That wiggly image is lost though.


* From various blogs: I am watching Worricker: Turks & Caicos. Someone used the word “bedefinitely”. “Be-” seemed to be used as an intensifier; bedefinitely not to allow an object (“I moan;” “I bemoan my fate.”) Interesting. I’d not thought of be- as so useful. Since one can just write, should one bewrite a book? At some time was that a hard rule in English? Or German?
----
I’ve never heard “bedefinitely,” and suspect it’s a bedeviling befuddlement. But “be-” as a prefix has multiple, rather fuzzy uses, an old, old Germanic grammatical thing, along with “a-/on-” before verbs and the old “ge-/y-/i-” that merged into “a-/on-” around the Middle English / Modern English period.
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Old 08-27-2018, 02:13 PM
Martin Elster Martin Elster is online now
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Hi Allen,

I like way the words sound together. I get a slight sense of what the theme or message is. Calvin Banger seems to be a fictitious character who writes a paper slamming Epicurus’s theory (that the world is composed of indestructible atoms). E’s caper (his philosophical prank) somehow cures Plotinus of his Neoplatonism.

My favorite line is L6 (exhaling whey from Plato’s dairy).

I know the title is a pun, though I’m not quite sure what it means in regards to the poem. Something to ponder.

The last line is a bit vague for me, but that’s another one to ponder.
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Old 08-27-2018, 09:14 PM
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Martin, some imponderables might have to remain imponderables. Thank you for your attention and pleasant reaction. The present title, though, could (in the right circumstances) be read as a kind of translation of “stand by your man” if he is a moderately (no more!) swerving husband etc, where the Epicurean “swerve” is exemplified by Dorothy Parker’s wondrous

“Hogamus higamus, men are polygamous.
Higamus hogamus, women monogamous.”

(Perhaps that is more or less still true, though I sometimes wonder. Consider stupendulous Bathsheba.—Sometimes, as Fats Domino said about women [“she’s just Nature’s child”]: “he {not she} can’t help it!” Fats Domino was a vibrant philosopher, on a par with Bergson, The Supremes, and Thomas Aquinas.)

The swerve is that “caper,” and is the unpredictable jump or deviation in trajectory of an atom that Epicurus’ Roman exponent Lucretius called the “clinamen”. Clinamen is the eighth month of the Pataphysical Calendar.

Last edited by Allen Tice; 08-28-2018 at 06:37 PM.
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  #16  
Old 08-27-2018, 11:30 PM
Martin Elster Martin Elster is online now
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Allen, thanks for explaining he title. Pretty clever. That Dorothy Parker couplet is delightful. But was it Dorothy Parker?

Quote:
Was the poem "Hogamous, Higamous" composed by William James under the influence of nitrous oxide?

http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pip...ch/107275.html

Several candidate creators have been mentioned in the literature in addition to James: Ogden Nash, Dorothy Parker, Lois Gould, Alice Duer Miller, and the wife of Amos Pinchot.

The earliest appearance of this poem that I have found is dated 1939 and this is many years after the death of James in 1910. The Cleveland Plain Dealer columnist Claire MacMurray contended that the lines were composed by "Mrs. Amos Pinchot" while she was enfolded in a dream state.

Cite: 1939 November 23, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Thanksgiving Nightmare by Claire MacMurray, Page 20, Column 3, Cleveland, Ohio. (GenealogyBank)

She dreamed one night that she had written a poem so beautiful, so wise, so close to the ultimate truth of life that she was immediately acclaimed by all the peoples on the earth as the greatest poet and philosopher of all the ages. Still half asleep as the dream ended, she stumbled out of bed and scribbled the poem down, realizing that she must take no risk of forgetting such deathless lines. She awoke in the morning with the feeling that something wonderful was about to happen—oh, yes! Her poem.

She clutched the precious paper and, tense with excitement, read the words she had written. Here they are:

Hogamus Higamus
Men are Polygamous
Higamus Hogamus
Women Monogamous
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Old 08-28-2018, 09:10 AM
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There is no school like a counter example. Thank you, Martin. Women are all natural geniuses; men need to go to school. Unless there is a wave for “dispraising,” “condemning,” or something more interesting and smooth, I will let this rest. Last call for suggestions to replace that fierce word, “damning.”
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  #18  
Old 08-28-2018, 10:40 AM
Jim Moonan Jim Moonan is online now
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Last call for suggestions to replace that fierce word, “damning.”

“Slamming”?
X
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  #19  
Old 08-28-2018, 12:33 PM
Martin Elster Martin Elster is online now
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"Slamming" is precisely the word I chose in my comment. I did that instinctively as a synonym of "damning."

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Originally Posted by Martin Elster View Post
Calvin Banger seems to be a fictitious character who writes a paper slamming Epicurus’s theory (that the world is composed of indestructible atoms).
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  #20  
Old 08-28-2018, 02:21 PM
Jim Moonan Jim Moonan is online now
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x
Well I'll be damned! So you did!
x
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