author

Joanna Pearson

Joanna Pearson’s poetry has appeared recently in Best New Poets 2010, Blackbird, The New Criterion, River Styx, Tar River Poetry, and elsewhere.  She recently completed both her MD and her M.F.A. at the Johns Hopkins University, and is now in the midst of her residency training as a physician at Johns Hopkins.  She lives in Baltimore with her husband, Matthew.

 

 

Nicholas Friedman

Nicholas Friedman’s poetry has appeared in several journals in the U.S., England, and Ireland. Newer work has appeared or is forthcoming in PN Review, American Arts Quarterly, The Sewanee Theological Review, Birmingham Poetry Review, and elsewhere. A life-long resident of Upstate New York, he works as assistant editor of EPOCH Magazine.

 

 

John Drury

John Drury is the author of Burning the Aspern Papers and The Disappearing Town, both published by Miami University Press. His new collection of poems, The Refugee Camp, is forthcoming from Turning Point Books in Fall 2011. He has also written The Poetry Dictionary and Creating Poetry, both published by Writer’s Digest Books. His awards include a Pushcart Prize, two Ohio Arts Council grants, an Ingram Merrill Foundation fellowship, and the Bernard F. Conners Prize from The Paris Review.

 

Traci Chee

Traci Chee is an always-writer and sometimes-teacher. She has a graduate degree in Creative Writing from San Francisco State and is looking forward to earning her teaching credential in 2012. In recent years her work has been published in The Big Stupid Review and ABJECTIVE, and her collection of short stories, Consonant Sounds for Fish Songs, is forthcoming from Aqueous Books. She lives in California, where she keeps a fast dog and a weekly blog. She likes fish and ships.

 

 

Stephen Collington

Stephen Collington studied English and Chinese at the University of Toronto, and Comparative Literature at the University of Tokyo. Which is as much as to say, writing in English about writing Chinese poetry in Japanese is the sort of thing that almost comes naturally to him at this point. (He also writes some poems himself now and then, though not always in Chinese.) He would like to dedicate his article to Naomi Fukumori, fellow student and friend, with thanks for the improbable gift of The Anyone-Can-Do-It Method all those years ago.

 

 

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