bio

Jay Rogoff

Jay Rogoff has published six books of poems, including The Long Fault, The Art of Gravity, Venera, and most recently Enamel Eyes, A Fantasia on Paris, 1870. He has recently completed a volume of new and selected poems, called Loving in Truth. He also writes dance criticism regularly for the Hopkins Review and Ballet Review. He lives in Saratoga Springs, New York.

 

 

Alexander Pushkin

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin was born in Moscow into an aristocratic family on June 6, 1799. He is often considered Russia’s greatest poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. His first major work was the poem Ruslan and Ludmila. His political verses associated him with the Decembrist revolt, causing him to be banished. He worked on Boris Godunov and the novel in verse Eugene Onegin before Nicholas I allowed him to return to Moscow in 1826. Pushkin died at age 37 following a duel with a French officer who was paying unscrupulous attention to his wife.

 

 

Heinrich Heine

Heinrich Heine was born in Düsseldorf, Germany in either 1797 or 1799. In 1831 he took exile in France, where he often struggled financially despite irregular patronage from a millionaire uncle. With freedom of speech he developed an international reputation for the lyricism, wordplay, irony, and excoriating satire of his poems, and was called the last of the Romantics. In 1841 he married Crescence Eugénie Mirat (“Mathilde”), who cared for him during eight years of paralysis; he wrote from bed until his death in 1856.

 

Terese Coe

Terese Coe’s poems and translations have appeared in Able Muse, Alaska Quarterly Review, Cincinnati Review, the Hopkins Review, Metamorphoses, New American Writing, Poetry, Threepenny Review, Agenda, Crannog, Cyphers, the Moth, Poetry Review, the TLS, and the Stinging Fly, among many other international journals. Her poem “More” was heli-dropped across London as part of the 2012 London Olympics Rain of Poems, and her latest collection, Shot Silk, was listed for the 2017 Poet’s Prize.

 

 

Horace ii.10

english translation

Horace ii.10

original Latin poem

Horace ii.10

Rectius vives, Licini, neque altum
semper urgendo neque, dum procellas
cautus horrescis, nimium premendo
            litus iniquum.

Auream quisquis mediocritatem
diligit, tutus caret obsoleti
sordibus tecti, caret invidenda
            sobrius aula.

Saepius ventis agitatur ingens
pinus et celsae graviore casu
decidunt turres feriuntque summos
            fulgura montis.

Sperat infestis, metuit secundis
alteram sortem bene praeparatum
pectus. Informis hiemes reducit
            Iuppiter; idem

summovet. Non, si male nunc, et olim
sic erit : quondam cithara tacentem
suscitat Musam neque semper arcum
            tendit Apollo.

Rebus angustis animosus atque
fortis adpare ; sapienter idem
contrahes vento nimium secundo
            turgida vela.

 

Breaking Expectations: The Prosodic Techniques of T. S. Eliot’s Approximated Verse

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